All posts filed under: Notebook

Review: Idrish (ইদ্রিস)

Hot on the heels of it’s premier at the Berwick Film & Media Arts Festival last month, Adam Lewis Jacob’s new film Idrish (ইদ্রিস) (UK/Bangladesh, 2021), had its first Birmingham screening at MAC on Wednesday 13th October 2021. Constructed from a bricolage of contemporary film, animated sequences and archival footage, Idrish (ইদ্রিস) tells the moving, powerful and affirming lifestory of Muhammad Idrish. A social worker, trade unionist and anti-deportation campaigner who has lived in Birmingham for over 40 years. Muhammad Idrish emerged as a key figure in an earlier film by Adam Lewis Jacob, People Meeting in a Room (UK, 2020) which was produced with Vivid Projects as part of Animate Project’s polytipch of films about the changing nature of contemporary employment: WORK. People Meeting in a Room responds to the archives of the Birmingham Trade Union Resource Centre (TURC)* which are stewarded by Vivid Projects. Muhammad Idrish appears in the archive as both an activist in the NALGO and later Unison trade unions, and also because of his work at the centre of the …

A6 sized book Black and white border, background and text saying that it is Handsworth Riots 1985, by Pogus Ceasar and edited by Craig Atkinson of Cafe Royal Books. Cover image is a black and white photograph of a small group of firefighters attempting to put out a fire that has been started in a car which has been turned on its side on a street of Victorian terraced houses

Review: Handsworth Riots 1985

Living in Birmingham and being interested in photography I have long been aware of the brilliant body of documentary photographic work produced by Pogus Caesar over the last four decades. However, it only through Kieran Connell’s excellent Black Handsworth which came out last year, that I became truly aware of his status as the premier visual chronicler of the 1985 riots which took place in that area of north west Birmingham. As such, when I found Café Royal Books were publishing Handsworth Riots 1985 a series of Caesar’s work documenting the event, I knew that I had to get a copy. Published almost 35 years to the day the riots began, the staple bound pamphlet in Café Royal’s trademark austere, black and white minimalism (resplendent in connotations of the best post-war British photo reportage publications) completely fulfilled my expectations.  On a primary level what the photos selected for the volume convey to the viewer a sense at once of what rioting in a mid-1980s inner Birmingham suburb looked like, and how the area looked in …